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Feinwerkbau 100 Match Air Pistol

Yes, another 10 meter match air pistol. I’d never fired (or even seen in person) a Feinwekbau 100, 102, or 103, but I’d heard that they’re great guns, the best of the single-stroke pneumatic era. One came up for sale at a fair price, and I’d just sold some expensive toys, so…. this one made it into my collection.

As you can see, functionally it’s not terribly different from the IZH-46m. There’s a large cocking arm underneath that rotates down and around 180 degrees to open. When you reach the fully extended position, the loading gate flips open:

Place a pellet in the loading tray, close the gate, and that o-ringed aluminum bolt pushes the pellet into the  barrel and seals it.

Bring the cocking arm back around and you compress a charge of air. It takes significantly more force to do so than cocking the IZH-46m, something that was dealt with in later versions of this pistol. The model 102 (there was no 101) used two cocking levers that divided the work between them. Easier, but a bit clumsy. The 103 used a longer cocking arm with better geometry to less cocking effort. It was also removable, which made the gun lighter.

The trigger on this gun, like the triggers on just about every other Feinwerkbau, is about as good as you would want. It’s adjustable for length of pull, position, first stage and second stage length and weight, and trigger shoe angle. I was able to get it just where I wanted with just a few adjustments to the position of the trigger, and left everything else alone.

Firing performance is excellent, as you might expect. It’s recoilless, of course, and absolutely free of any vibration or movement on firing. The sights are more of less identical to this eon my LP-80, being adjustable for not only windage and elevation but also for the width of the rear sight notch, something I really appreciate. For some reason the sights were cranked way to one one side and very low when I received it, but after a quick check of the manual to see which way the controls worked I had it on target pretty quickly.

As it points better than my IZH-46 and has a better trigger as well, I decided the Izzy would go and this gun would take its place. If you’re looking for one for yourself, 100s, 102s and 103s in excellent working condition generally  run from $600 to $700. They don’t seem to show up for sale as often as other guns, perhaps because once someone buys one, they tend to hang on to it. Like the Feinwerkbau recoilless spring  guns, you could shoot one of these in competition todays without giving up very much to shooters with $1500-2000 PCP guns, although your cocking arm might get a bit tired over a long match.

[Single-Stroke Pneumatic (SSP) air pistols and rifles were an intermediate stage between the complex recoilless spring-powered guns that dominated ISSF competition in the 1970s and today’s modern pre-charged pneumatic guns. With no spring to wear out, and no spring hysteresis, SSPs are more efficient than spring guns and have much less vibration. The very first match SSP was the Walther LP1, which came out in the mid-70s. While it was a very accurate gun, it was harder to cock than the Feinwerkbau and didn’t really challenge it on the firing line. It wasn’t until the LP100 came out in 1988 that the big move to SSPs started. SSPs in turn were replaced by CO2 powered guns, which were less fatiguing to shoot (as there was no cocking effort) and problems with fluctuating gas pressure at different temperatures and altitudes led to CO2 guns being replaced by PCP guns. But when it comes to actual firing performance, there’s not a lot of difference between an SSP and a PCP gun.]